How to Introduce Peanuts to Children

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We all know that peanuts can be dangerous for children with peanut allergies, but when is the best time to begin introducing them to your child’s diet? Dr. Jessica Long gives us the lowdown on this tricky topic…

 

With two girls under the age of five, peanut butter is a staple in our house. It’s easy, delicious, and packs 8 grams of protein in a two tablespoon serving. However, for many families, peanuts are cause for real concern. Peanuts are the leading cause of food allergies in children and can cause serious allergic reactions and even anaphylaxis. For years, the medical community has been trying to figure out how best to prevent peanut allergy. Doctors used to advise parents to not expose their children to peanuts until they were at least two years old but that was not helping to decrease the number of people with allergies. Earlier this year, new recommendations came out in response to research showing that it’s actually early exposure, as opposed to late, that helps prevent peanut allergies.

So who do we now recommend try peanuts? Most healthy infants over the age of 4 months may benefit from early introduction of peanuts. However, some children may require allergy testing before trying peanuts so always discuss with your doctor before introducing new foods. For example, if your child has severe eczema or egg allergy, a peanut allergy test should first be done by 4-6 months old. Also, children with a strong family history of peanut allergy might need to see an allergist before trying peanut protein.

If your doctor gives the thumbs up for introducing peanuts to your baby, you can offer Bamba (a puff peanut product) or make your own thinned smooth peanut protein mixture. Combine two teaspoons of smooth peanut butter with two to three teaspoons of warm water or pureed baby food to make a perfect two gram serving which is the ideal amount for your little one.

The first feeding should be a small amount, just the tip of a teaspoon. Watch your infant for ten minutes to make sure there are no reactions such as hives, vomiting or nasal symptoms. If there are no reactions, continue to offer the rest of the 2 gram serving of peanut protein at your baby’s normal feeding pace.

Once your baby has successfully tried peanut protein, it is recommended that you offer two gram servings three or more times a week. If your infant develops any allergic symptoms within two hours of eating peanut protein, stop and contact your pediatrician. Remember to avoid whole nuts until kids are over 5 years old as well dollops of peanut butter until kids are over 4 years old due to choking concerns.